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The Full Mind Weigh™ to Lifelong Weight Management, a program of the Institute for Lifelong Weight Management – teaching you the skills you need to keep the weight off forever!

Try Something Different

Most of us have tried many new things in the past that we were unsure about before we tried them – and we probably ended up loving at least some of them! I know I have – despite my initial hesitation. Sushi is a great example!

Sometimes clients will tell me, “I don’t like vegetables”, and I’ll gently inquire, “Have you tried every one of them?”

Did you know that there are literally thousands of types of vegetables in the world? At the end of this post you’ll find a link to a long list of different types of vegetables. I’m sure I’ve tried only a fraction of them. How about you?

Another thing that clients sometimes struggle with is not knowing how to prepare vegetables in a delicious yet healthy way – without lots of dressings, cheese, butter, or other unhealthy ingredients.

Personally, I like to grill, stir-fry or oven-roast my vegetables with a little cooking spray, using herbs/spices for flavoring. Some of them work best raw in a salad, while others are quite delicious lightly steamed.

I’m going to challenge myself to try a new vegetable each week. If I don’t like it, there’s always another one to try!

Will you join me in this challenge?

Healthy eating and weight management require us to eat lots of vegetables! There’s really no way to escape this fact.

The folks at www.nerdfitness.com suggest finding one vegetable to introduce into your diet if you’re a vegetable hater: “Stop saying you hate all vegetables. You simply haven’t yet found a vegetable that you LIKE. When you find one vegetable that you like, you can progress from there. Start out by trying tiny pieces. If you’re out to dinner with family or friends, ask to try a tiny bit of a veggie from their plates. Find your gateway vegetable. Take one bite of many different kinds of veggies, and see which ones you actually enjoy. Before each bite, clear your mind. Stop going into each veggie encounter expecting to hate it!”

According to www.nerdfitness.com, vegetables are good for us for many reasons including:

  • They are nutrient dense: “Think of vegetables as one of our body’s most efficient fuel sources: they are packed full of vital macro- and micronutrients.”
  • They fill you up, without ‘filling you up’: “Ever seen what 200 calories worth of broccoli looks like? It’s the size of a grocery bag compared to 200 calories of a donut or other treat. It’s hard to overeat when you’re eating carrots or celery!”
  • Veggies keep your body operating at max efficiency: “Vegetables are a great way to keep your…um…indoor plumbing…functioning properly!”
  • They can be delicious!

Here are some additional tips from www.lifehacker.com:

  • Mix what you like with new, healthy foods (example: add kale or spinach to your lasagna, top your burger with grilled veggies, throw a bunch of veggies into a smoothie, add veggies to your omelets)
  • Try different ways of preparing veggies (example: roasted cauliflower or broccoli tastes completely different from the usual steamed or boiled version; try kale chips or sweet potato chips as a healthier alternative to potato chips; try making baked carrot fries; try zucchini noodles; try mashed cauliflower as an alternative to mashed potatoes)
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (like baby carrots), whose flavors have not yet intensified
  • Eat more of the veggies that you DO like, and decrease the amounts of other foods that you eat (example: in stews and other dishes, make the veggies a larger portion of the meal, and the meat and carbs a lower one)
  • Start small (when you’re trying to form any new positive habit, you’re more likely to be successful if you start out slowly or gradually)

Here’s an excellent guide to selecting the best quality vegetables: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-select-the-best-produce-1-108350

Share your discoveries of new vegetables that you love, with me and with other readers, by commenting on this blog.

“Don’t fear failure so much that you refuse to try new things. The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have, and should have.” – Unknown

“Do not be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Everyone has a ‘risk muscle’. You keep it in shape by trying new things. If you don’t it atrophies. Make a point of using it at least once a day.” – Roger Von Oech

“Life is trying things to see if they work.” – Ray Bradbury

Here’s the link to a list of vegetable varieties:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_vegetables

Sources:

http://lifehacker.com/5972108/how-to-learn-to-love-healthy-food-even-if-youre-a-picky-eater

http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2014/09/04/vegetable-haters-how-to-start-eating-vegetables/

To learn more about trying something different for lifelong weight management, join my next class, The Full Mind Weigh™ to Lifelong Weight Management. For details, check my website: www.thefullmindweigh.com.

For frequent updates on this topic and related topics on weight management and motivation, follow me on Facebook and on Pinterest: Institute for Lifelong Weight Management; On Twitter and Instagram: InstituteForLWM.

Join me for my free Teleseminar on Sunday November 16th at 12 noon Central Standard Time: “The Top 7 Mistakes that Smart People make when trying to Lose Weight and Keep it Off Forever – and how YOU can Avoid Them!” For details, call-in information, and to register, email me: doreen@thefullmindweigh.com.

Email me if you’d like to receive my monthly newsletter “News you can Use” and my free “Tip of the Month”: doreen@thefullmindweigh.com

With your continued health in mind,

Doreen Lerner, Ph.D.

Director, The Institute for Lifelong Weight Management

Creator, The Full Mind Weigh™ to Lifelong Weight Management

www.thefullmindweigh.com

The Institute for Lifelong Weight Management provides education and training. The Full Mind Weigh™ is strictly an educational program and is not a substitute for medical or psychological evaluation or treatment. If you think you may be suffering from an eating disorder, please consult with a qualified mental health professional who is trained to evaluate and treat eating disorders.